A.J. Walker

writerer

If Music Be The Food Of Love

The footy season is indeed now over but last week magical Anfield held another event: the Rolling Stones first Liverpool gig for nearly fifty years. When the tickets went on sale I briefly considered getting one. I mean an iconic band in a wonderful stadium. I'd previously watched one gig there, which was Paul McCartney in 2008 (the Capital of Culture gig). I'd done the same that time to by not getting a ticket when they first went on sale but really wishing I had as it approached. Then the day before the gig an acquaintance said he had a spare and I snaffled it up in super quick time. It did not disappoint. But I'd never seen Macca before and I've been lucky enough to see the Stones several times including the Ahoy Arena in Rotterdam, at Twickenham, and at Glastonbury, so I didn't have quite the same push to spend the one hundred pounds or so on a ticket. Still on the day I was kinda jealous of everyone going. You really can't beat a live music event - be it giants of history like them or newer or more intimate events.

Felice Brothers

So I decided that I'd get a ticket or two for gigs which would fill the need (and be cheaper than seeing the one band (or two if you counted the Bunnymen)). I quickly got on the case and over a couple of days got myself a ticket for the brilliant Felice Brothers, who are playing Leaf on Bold Street in a few weeks, and Frank Turner for later in the year (October). I'll keep my eye out for another gig or two and still come in below the cost of seeing Jagger, Richards and co. Notwithstanding that it did sound like it was a top night and everyone seems to have enjoyed Anfield that night and I do kinda wish I'd gone. Having the Felice Brothers and Frank to look forward to is pretty damn cool though.

Frank Tagain

Over the last couple of weeks I have not done a single open mic, which is rare since the return of them to the hostelries in Liverpool. And so it was that I decided to go to a new open mic night at the Angus who had announced they were to move their night to a Sunday and have it on a more regular basis (at least whilst the football season is in abeyance). John Witherspoon who I know from his hosting the mic at the Keystone (and now the Belvedere) is to be the new host but on this occasion he had to pass it on to another regular guitarist: Mike Blue. I pootled down to the Angus just before the start time at 8pm and found there was only one guy with a guitar already there; this turned out to be Mike. Shortly afterwards he got up to play and introduce the night asking if anyone for requests, saying he hoped some people would turn up to play soon. But town looked quiet everywhere as far as I could tell from my walk to the Angus - and from the people passing the windows of the bar. Quite a few people would be playing in the Jacaranda open mic which has been going for some time now. It'll take a few weeks of word of mouth for this new night to become more widely known (not everyone is on Social Media all the time - hard to believe I know). Eventually I let it be known that I could go up an play lest Mike end up playing the whole night as a gig and I went up and played three of my usual songs ('Oh My Sweet Carolina,' 'Heart Breaks Like the Dawn, and 'Whiskey in my Whiskey' - the last one being the Felice Brothers who I'll see at Leaf). Then Mike returned. He hadn't seen me play before, so for a nice change he'd not been subject to the same songs week after week.

As the night moved on it became more apparent that other singers were unlikely to turn up, at least not in numbers, and Mike continued playing some great songs (largely requests from the audience) including a couple of great Neil Young covers. The couple in front of me then suggested it was my turn to go up again, probably to allow Mike a toilet break and opportunity to refuel and I duly did (I felt obliged) playing 'You Couldn't Get Arrested' and 'Splendid Isolation.' Mike continued and finally after he played a fine U2 cover I went up a third time and played my own U2 cover (albeit a trad song) 'Van Diemen's Land' and (half a version of) 'Somewhere Down the Road.' Mike played on till time was called and beyond - and that was that. We shook hands and chatted. Like John and Ali, Mike was an accomplished guitarist with a good voice and stage presence and was a thoroughly nice chap, it was a shame a few more (or even just one more!) people didn't go up to play.

Several people in the bar said they enjoyed my songs which was a) nice and b) made me wonder what they had been drinking.

I've a soft spot for the Angus (for it's music and its beer) and I really hope in the longer term the open mic will succeed, whether that is on a Sunday or another night. Ultimately it will always be a moveable feast due to football supporters being an important part of its clientele; and because of the regular professional gigs it hosts. It was good to get back to playing in front of people again and I won't leave it as long to the next time. Maybe even the Belvedere on Thursday?


Onwards and Upwards. And yes: Play On!


Comments

Only Ever Liverpool

The footy season is over and boy what a season it was. When people complain we 'only' won two cups then they need their heads testing if they are (supposedly) Liverpool fans, or jealous if they are unlucky enough to follow another team. I missed the parade after 2005 as I'd been at the match and the parade was taking place when I was making my way back and then at Sunny Beach. It looked amazing. The next one I did get to was for when we won 'only' the `FA Cup. And the following one was three years ago when we won the European Cup (or Champion's League if you must be a pedant). And what a fuckin' parade that was. It was unbelievable for the fans, the club, and the city (at least for half the city anyway). Of course when we won the League (okay, the Premier League) we were unable to celebrate it appropriately due to that damnable virus. Then came the season that was 2021/22.

IMG_3209
Three years on and back in the Sanctuary for a pre-parade pint. Cheers!

It's just been a brilliant season. Would have loved to win either the league or the Champion's League, but hell we ran those competitions as close as humanly possible, whilst winning the only other two competitions we were in whilst playing an incredible 63 games - and lost only 4 games all season. The last game of the league season went within about half an hour of us improbably winning the title when Villa conspired to take a two nil lead against City and then give it away plus one. For a while there was hope. And it's the hope that kills ya!

IMG_3212
Same spot as last time for the parade (minus the flyover).

Then came the Euro final and it was in many ways an anticlimax. We lost by a solitary goal after largely being the better team, but being unable to quite finish it off. Perhaps those 63 games had told. For heaven's sake that may be why winning all four of those competitions has never been done before. As the late kick off got announced and the stories of what was happening in France slowly filtered through the game became secondary and a real shame for what should after all be the showcase of the beautiful game. So we didn't win. Shame, but we'll fight on. And what a team we have. Changes are inevitable and Mane announced he was to leave the club in the summer and we know not yet what is in store for Salah and Firmino, who's contracts are up at the end of next season (as Mane's is). Then there's the Kop Legend that is Origi saying farewell too. It's the nature of the game.

IMG_3226

So on Sunday I went out to cheer on the teams (including the Ladies, who'd won promotion to the top table by becoming champions themselves). My friends almost didn't come out after being 'a bit tired' from the night before, but sense prevailed – and they were glad they made the effort. We made the decision (well I did) that we'd do what did last time and meet up in the Sanctuary on Lime Street and watch the parade's progress on YouTube so that we could time our move to the route at a decent time. It went, like last time, perfectly.

IMG_3228

The parade looked brilliant in person and along the whole route on YouTube. It could have been a flat atmosphere after the two close-but-no-cigar moments of there preceding weeks. The fans and team are really something else.

IMG_3229
Klopp in the centre of Liverpool

IMG_3230
Liverpool really do put on the best displays.

IMG_3231
A great defence at the back; of the bus.

IMG_3253
Post parage pint in Doctor Duncan's - with my old Euro Flag t-shirt.

In the aftermath of Paris there has so much come out about the organisation and policing it was gobsmackingly awful. Watching some of the footage it is incredible how well behaved the fans were with the provocation from the police and the local yobs. It could have been so much worse. It is amazing that no-one was killed. The French have of course spun the old trope of English football hooligans and Liverpool in particular. The footage shows otherwise, They claim that there were tens of thousands of fans with forged tickets. This was not the case. Although I'm sure there would have been some of course.

I went to Athens back in 2007 after I'd booked flights months before just in case we got there. We did. I stayed on a small island in the Bay of Athens and had to get into the city by ferry each day I wanted to visit. It was a lovely week, I ended up unable to get a ticket for the final – and giiven our history in particular I would never have used a blag one. Ended up watching the match in the Craft Bar with some old time fans who'd been to all the previous Euro Finals but been stuck like me without one. It was a great night in the end despite our defeat. Ended up drinking until 8am (which was handy because that was the time for the first ferry in the morning). Almost forgot we lost by that point.

In the year between our two matches with AC Milan I'd similarly booked a flight 'in case we got there' for the final – it was in Paris. Met up with a few Liverpool fans there that had done the same thing. It was an interesting weekend in a multitude of ways – including see how the Arsenal fans were (a little bit embarrassing – why the hell sing songs about Spurs when you're sat in a bar in Paris awaiting your first cup final? The mind boggles.). But the worst thing was the police. At one point a young black man was walking past a cafe I was in and the waiter started shouting something at him. A couple of policemen arrived on the scene and promptly handcuffed the man to a railing by the main road. They then proceeded to batter the man with their batons. He'd just been walking past the cafe and was fully restrained. No one did anything. It was something the locals had evidently seen before. It was shocking. The next day I was having a coffee in a square in the sunshine. There were two couples sat on a grassed area chatting beneath some trees. Two policemen walked up the small slope towards the couples and proceeded to use their batons on the poor people. The couples were black. It was daylight, Lunchtime. There was no fear from the police from doing what they were doing. It was totally messed up.

Seeing what the police were doing at this year's cup final it is clear that they are a fucked up organisation – and evidently the French expect it of them.

Yesterday Real Madrid issued a statement about the treatment of their fans at the Final, and UEFA then seemed resigned to have to quickly apologise after that. It is good that Madrid did that but it is of course obnoxious that UEFA were happy to say nothing as long as it was just Liverpool fans, who they evidently felt could take the blame for their callous ineptitude. Both UEFA and the French police have a lot to answer for – I don't expect anything to improve in the short term. It would be nice to think that something positive would come out of this, but I wont be holding my breath. Then there is the French Government and their immediate knee jerk reaction to blame the English fans rather than to step back and wait for investigations and heads to roll. Truly awful.

All in all the events around the final have left a sour taste in the mouth. And I've barely thought about the actual football game. A crying shame.

YOU'LL NEVER WALK ALONE
Comments

My Return to the Sofar

My Return to the Sofar (and Another Fine Return)

I last went to a Sofar gig in September in a place called Slate. It featured the excellent Heavy North who have subsequently gone on to release a really rather wicked album. Get on it. But last week I got a ticket for my second event. For those that don't know the deal, the ticket is for £10 and you don't find out the location (other than the city) until 36 hours before – and you don't know who is playing until they get up on the stage (or their name is on their kit!).

Last week the venue was
One Fine Day on Old Hall Street. The venue itself is not currently permanently open, but is used for individual events and weddings etc. I'd never been to there before and it proved to be a nice place with good acoustics. It was really busy with not a seat left as far as I could see and I ended up sat at the front. I moved along to help a couple of later comers get nearer and sit together – and therefore I ended up in a nice padded seat instead of a plastic one. Win win.IMG_2860

The three acts of the night were all fab. Loved the local singer songwriter
Eleanor Nelly's stories and attitude – and her songs and singing was excellent. Taylor the Chapter, who wants to never be known as Gary, was solid. And finally the main act were a Wigan four piece called Stanleys. They looked so young to me, but so does everyone these days. There songs and assuredness were great. I've already spent some time listening to them on Spotify. They could definitely go on to be pretty successful if this performace was anything to go by. I believe they have already supported the Lathums, which is pretty impressive.

IMG_2874

The Stanleys played five songs:

'What's Been and Gone'
'Why Would I?'
'A Better Life'
'Look Back'
'Maybe'


Check them out on
Spotify, or better still get on down to see them when they're next playing near you.

The following day was the return of the Open Mic hosted by John Witherspoon. The
Belvedere pub had snaffled the gentleman and given him the opportunity to host the event following the recent demise of the Keystone. It was held in the upstairs room on the left. Despite the announcement on just being made earlier in the week the news had spread very well amongst all the regulars from just that short distance down the road.

IMG_2900
The beer was on.

Great to see so many turn up. It became a most memorable night when the entire area around this part of Liverpool was plunged into a power cut and the playing continued without the PA and under candle light. Moody stuff.

IMG_2904
The lights were on…

Guy2
… the lights were off.
Comments

A Poignant Affair

Another Strange Thursday

After a strange night last Thursday and the a good, strange one last week it was time for another strange Thursday–and this one a very sad and poignant want. At the start of the week there came an announcement that had been mooted for a short while that the Keystone was to close down. The home of my almost weekly open mic nights out. Closing. Bloody hell. And although the announcement was only made on Tuesday it was not a 'heads up' it'll happen eventually, it was a 'it's closing this very week.' Bloody awful.

Really feel for all the great staff who are having to look to ply their trade elsewhere. Thankfully it appears that, at least some of them, have quickly found some work in other Liverpool city centre pubs and (at least one) in a new brewery tap–and another returning to another field that she hasn't worked in for a while. Sometimes an end is an opportunity. Good luck to them all of course.

Personally to me it is a sorry shame to lose one of my favourite pubs of the last year. Last year it burst onto the scene due to its great garden, when so many pubs in the city don't have them. It allowed them to open up when most pubs couldn't. I had many a nice afternoon and evening there either reading, or writing, or just chatting with the staff and the regulars (and sometimes very irregulars). I did my best to introduce it to friends and drinkers, whilst hoping it wouldn't become too popular with the wrong regulars. Then in November the open mic was started, hosted by John Witherspoon, and that quickly became one of the first things in my weekly diary (along with European footy nights in the Head of Steam or the Fly).

IMG_1772

I hadn't been playing my guitar that much in the last year. The whole MS thing was worrying earlier in the year when I couldn't even feel my fingers and wondered at one stage whether I'd ever pick up a guitar again. To go from hardly playing at all to playing in front of people at least twice a month was brilliant.


IMG_1783 2
With the demise of the venue I dare say I'll look into playing in other places. But I am certainly going to miss John and the regulars (and irregulars) who played at the Keystone. This last open mic I had plenty of songs to choose from. I thankfully didn't have to follow Ian Prowse again. I played three of my most regular songs: 'Oh My Sweet Carolina', 'You Couldn't Get Arrested' and 'Whiskey in my Whiskey.' I played the latter one for Ben who had requested it the previous week. He was deep in loud conversation with Si and didn't even notice I'd played–let alone notice I'd played his request (albeit a week late).

IMG_1786

IMG_1782

IMG_1773

There were lots of chatting with the staff and regulars who were all pretty surprised and depressed about the news. But I was glad I made the effort to go–even though I had to leave early as I was working the next day. Ho hum.

IMG_1790
My last strum through a C-F-G ditty for a while I dare say.

Onwards and Upwards.

Comments

Does This Train Stop?

Not One Thing, Another

After a strange night last Thursday mixing a tiring week, not sure I was going to go to the open mic, and then difficult travel, this week I was always going to play. It was again affected by none running buses but I got there about 8:30pm this week. It ended with me playing and going up to play straight AFTER we'd been given four songs by Ian Prowse. Yes, people. The local legend that is Mr Prowse opened for me. Who'd have thunk it??

IMG_1655
John

John was hosting as usual and then a few newbies arrived to the evening including Ian. Flippin' heck. Obviously I'd have preferred to get on and off the stage early doors to relax, but I had to wait until our new arrivals played. There was a lot of "
this is from my new album," and "this was off my first album," going on from several of the players this week. I am not worthy.

Meanwhile in the conservatory there was a
Ladies That Beer event hosted by a couple of my colleagues. Beers were being drunk, and beers were being talked about. It was a busy night in the Key'.

IMG_1656
Liam Sweeney

IMG_1664
Ian Prowse

The Procrastinator
Your's Truly, aka The Procrastinator

IMG_1660
John Lindsay playing a new song

IMG_1658
Soft and cool, Ike

After far too long wondering when (or, at one stage, if) I was going to get on, I'd ummed and ahhd about whether to play some stuff I don't normally play, but as the evening lengthened I decided my only real option was to play the ones I know best - and not worry about peering through the gloom at written lyrics. As it was the nerves got to me a little (yes, I got nerves - even if the MS seems to hate them) and I misplayed some chord changes and played through a few times when I had a bit of a lyrical mind melt. Still, I got through it in the end and was happy to have played the same night as Ian and the others - even if I didn't entirely do myself justice.

John was happy to see my Procrastinator T-shirt again. He says he likes my T-shirts, which is odd as other than the two times I've worn this I've pretty much been lumberjack shirts all the way. It's like going back to glasses from wearing contacts, people soon forget you ever did anything else. Meanwhile I just forget whether the next chord is an A minor or an F. Or maybe a C.

The next time I play on the same stage as Ian I hope it will be at the Cavern where he hosts an Open Mic - but for none covers only. I better get writing a hit then. Meanwhile here is a classic from the gentleman, '
Does This Train Stop on Merseyside?'

Onwards and Upwards.










Comments

Balinese Dancer

A Last Minute Call to the Balinese Dancr

After a strange and a bit of a tough day at work I was undecided whether to go to the regular Open Mic at the Keystone. I ended up home later than usual and a bit knackered. I hadn't seen anything saying the open mic was on for sure (even though it is pretty much always on) and contemplated staying in. When I looked on Instagram there was a message saying the open mic was on and hosted by John Witherspoon as usual. But there was a second photo - and when I looked at it, it was me playing last week with my Procrastinators T-shirt on. And to top it off they name checked me with; '
Guest appearance from our very very regular who DEFINITELY knows we are using his photo.' Well, no I didn't and at the time on the sofa I wasn't sure I was even leaving the house. But the message… I mean how could I not turn up?

So I got changed and went for the bus. It never came and so I had to wait for the next one which was over half an hour later. It was definitely not the best of days. In the end I was there about 9pm - and it was packed.

IMG_1493

IMG_1500

IMG_1494

I'd been playing some songs over the last week or so that I hadn't played before and had thought I may give them a go. When I went up to play I decided to give them both a go, but needed the reassurance of having the words in front go me. And so it was that I played one regular song and two new ones (if new means new to me playing live). And so my mini set list was:

'
Oh My Sweet Carolina' - Ryan Adams
'
110 in the Shade' - Chuck Prophet
'
Something You Ain't Got' - Cracker

I needed to play a regular song first to get into the swing of it. But I was very happy to have played some different stuff; albeit my usual favourite artists from albums recorded back in the day. It's always nice hearing some people saying they enjoy the words and to think that maybe I've introduced even a single person to the wonderful songwriting (and then when they hear the originals: the Guitar!) of Chuck Prophet (and Cracker). I've actually played three Chuck Prophet songs of the same album now; '
Somewhere Down the Road,' 'Heart Breaks Like the Dawn,' and now '110 in the Shade.' There's loads of Chuck's albums on Spotify, which I can thoroughly recommend, however this particular album, 'Balinese Dancer,' is not on Spotify. So if you wanna check out the tracks then maybe buy the album (I know, a bit old school) or just have a look/listen on YouTube.

IMG_1499

IMG_1497

IMG_1505

I was definitely glad I made the effort in the end.

But don't ask me about getting home (yes, it was that kind of day again).


Comments

A Family Link to Donbas

Was looking at a little information I have on my great grandfather, Peter Rigby from Wigan, the father of my grandmother Kathleen. He was a mining engineer who went out and lived in Ukraine in the first and second decade of the 20th Century. My grandma mentioned living there a few times in her later years (she lived to 98) and reminisced about escaping there before the Russian Revolution. She always mentioned Odessa when she talked about it (and said she only remembered the words for snow and sled from her time there - there was no mention of 'Rosebud' though), so I always thought they'd lived there. But reading an article about Peter it was actually Donestk (then called Hughesoffka). Maybe they had trips over to Odessa or my gran remembered traveling through it. The city was an industrial one and had several mining operations where Peter worked, ironically for a Mr J.H. Walker. Of course many years later his granddaughter would marry a Walker (aka dad). I assume there were no links (J.H. Walker was from Wigan, whilst all our Walker relations are from western Scotland).

IMG_1243

The haulage engines used in the mines were supplied from Messrs Walker Brothers, Wigan.

IMG_1245

Peter was born in 1874 and died in 1952. He was in Ukraine for some eleven years working for the colliery company ‘New Russia Co.’ He’d have been approximately 32 when he moved there and 43 on his return. According to an article about it, he actually tried to go back to Ukraine after returning with the family to Lancashire. I thought at first that perhaps he liked working there. But then I noticed his wife (Alice Jane Rigby) died that year so maybe he was running away from that? There is no-one to ask. At some point I may have to do some more work on the family tree and maybe some answers will be obvious - or at least there my be some clues. In any case he only made it as far as Newcastle though as in view of what was going on the ship was ordered not to sail.

IMG_1252

There must have been a lot of British and other Europeans there before the Revolution. The town was split between a ‘workers’ and a ‘European’ area. And the town was called Hughesoffka after a Merthyr born engineer and entrepreneur
John Hughes who founded the city after setting out there with ‘100 workers and their families’ mostly from the Welsh valleys in eight boats in 1870. They built an iron works there and collieries under the New Russia Company Ltd. The European workers, including Hughes’ brothers who ran the ironworks, left the city when the plant fell under the control of the Bolsheviks in 1917. Maybe Peter, with his wife and children left with the Hughes’? The city was to become Stalino in 1924 and then Donetsk in 1961.

Marion and Kathleen

It is strange to think that my grandmother spent some of her childhood in the capital of Donbas - the scene of so much death and destruction for years before even the current war; She would have been about 14 when she left and her sister, Marion, even younger. Donbas has been split into areas controlled by Ukraine and Pro-Russian Separatists after civil war supported by Russia since 2014. Incidentally in a nod to the reason my great grandfather and his family were over there, just over 105 years ago, the regional name Donbas is a portmanteau word from the ‘Donets Coal Basin’.
Comments

Still Strummin'

Played at the open mics in the Keystone and Angus over the last couple of weeks. Great to carry on with it. But I do wonder whether I should do fewer and in the intervening weeks practice more - and maybe write some songs too. We shall see. It'll be a hard drug to give up.

IMG_0935
Strumming' at the Keystone a couple of weeks ago.

IMG_0946

Good to see Barry playing for the first time and the return of Sam Lee too. A nice evening all round.


IMG_1109 2

Cold weather on Wednesday night meant a smaller group of players than usual Meant the players who did turn up did a lot more than the usual three or four songs.I ended up playing eight songs. Eek!

IMG_1105
One of my favourite pics of me playing - the Angus.

IMG_1147 3
Another fab open mic at the Keystone


Comments

Almost A Gig~ish

As is almost set in stone I went once again to the Keystone open mic. Recently there have always been 12-14 people playing which is incredible really. And to fit everyone in we are each limited to three songs each. This week though we seemed to be a few people down though there were still plenty of regulars and a newbie couple to the Keystone who just happened on the place (Visions of Albion). I suspect the regular carnage that is Liverpool on Paddy's Day probably put a few people of visiting town on the Day of the Green Pavement Pizza.

IMG_0731
Visions of Albion

DaveSinnot
Mr Sinnott doing his bluesy thing

As we were a few down everyone had there usual three songs then those still there went up and played another two each. So I played five songs. Yes, FIVE. That's almost a gig worth.

The songs were:

  • Oh My Sweet Carolina (obviously)
  • Take Me Down To The Infirmary (Cracker)
  • Landlocked Blues (Bright Eyes)
  • Heart Breaks Like the Dawn (obviously)
  • Van Diemen's Land (hey, it was Paddy's Day)

MeAndWords
Words needed/not needed. No one told me to sort my hair out!

Guy1
Some Guy.

IMG_0742

I needed the lyrics in front of me to to Take Me Down and to Landlocked Blues. First time I've done that at the open mic. But they were new songs for me to play; so fair enough.

IMG_0756
Charley style photobombing.

Spent most the evening on the lovely session
Trappers Hat from Brimstage Brewery, then ended the evening with the epic Keystone IPA (just a schooner) from Chapter. So all in all a very good evening - and no pavement pizzas around this area of town. Huzzah!

Comments

Great Live Music

Live music is great. I love it. And last week was fab for it. I ended up playing two open mics in one night on Thursday. I played in both the Head of Steam and the Keystone. Two of my favourite Liverpool pubs. It was good to do.

JackPlayingHOS
Jack playing at the Head of Steam

FC333F4B-4E95-4AD7-A527-56CE150DF8CD
Playing at the Keystone

At the Jack's open mic at the Head of Steam I played four songs. I saw the to women that were sat next to me nodding away to my tunes which was nice. And they were periodically looking at their phones. When I spoke to them afterwards it turned out they were Polish and on their phones they were typing in the lyrics I was singing to find out whose songs I was singing. If I've introduced Chuck Prophet, Green on Red, and Ryan Adams to some more people my job on this world is done.

In the Keystone I played three of the same songs at
John Witherspoon's mic. There was no need for the people there to look up my songs as I play them there every week of course. It was great to be invited to John's full band gig at Jimmy's on the Saturday.

IMG_0582
John Witherspoon at Jimmys

It was a long day on Saturday as the Liverpool match at Brighton was at 12:30. It is far too early for any game. Watched it with a couple of mates at the Head of Steam - we won (0-2) and are still on the coattails of City. Then it was a question of filling my time with reading and what not before the evening gig. I made it in one piece and was very glad to have made it. John's band was great and he looked so in his element it was lovely to see. Definitely worth seeing him play if you get the chance. The support from the singer songwriter Thom Moorcroft was excellent too.

IMG_0572
John with his full band.

Live music is great innit?
Comments